Break the Cycle

The Break the Cycle 10 Conference is April 23-24, 2015

To find our more and register, please click the link below:

BTC 10 information


Break the Cycle 9 was a great success. Thank you to all those who particpiated and attended.

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A project of

Southeast Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit
Innovative Solutions for Disadvantage and Disability
Sustainability Initiatives at Emory University
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Free and open to the public.
Registration will open online at www.pehsu.emory.edu or www.isdd-home.org


Break the Cycle is a collaborative interdisciplinary research and training program to cultivate leadership in children’s environmental health disparities. The target populations are communities where the environmental hazards are related to circumstances of social and economic disadvantage.

Thursday April 23 2015  8:30am - 5:30 PM
University students from a variety of disciplines and universities develop projects that will provide strategies to Break the Cycle of Environmental Health Disparities in vulnerable children. A group of selected student projects will be presented at this conference.

Friday April 24 – 8.30am to 12.00pm
A half day interactive workshop will examine the costs and benefits of Breaking the Cycle of Environmental Health Disparities from different perspectives. 
The program will include the examination of environmental factors and health outcomes with a view to examining how investment of time, energy and financial capital in prevention can lead to a direct benefit in terms of improved health and productivity and an indirect benefit in terms of financial savings.
Breakfast provided.



For more information, visit us at: www.pehsu.emory.edu or www.isdd-home.org or www.sustainability.emory.edu

Funding for this conference was made possible (in part) by the cooperative agreement award number 1U61TS000118-05 from the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

Acknowledgement: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) supports the PEHSU by providing funds to ATSDR under Inter-Agency Agreement number DW-75-92301301-0. Neither EPA nor ATSDR endorse the purchase of any commercial products or services mentioned in PEHSU publications.


Overview of Break the Cycle


Break the Cycle is a collaborative interdisciplinary research and training program to cultivate leadership in children’s environmental health disparities. The target populations are communities where the environmental hazards are related to circumstances of social and economic disadvantage. University students from a variety of disciplines are encouraged to develop projects that will “Break the Cycle of Environmental Health Disparities” among vulnerable children. Each student was required to develop a project that focuses on reducing or preventing environmental health related illnesses and disorders for children who live in these communities. The students work with their academic mentors and the Break the Cycle Faculty to bring the project to successful completion, present the results of their work at a national conference, and write an article for publication in an international journal.

Environmental Health Disparities
The diagram below represents the cycle of social and economic disadvantage as it is reflected in the physical and social environmental factors that can affect the health, growth, and development of children and contribute to our societal challenge of Environmental Health Disparities. Ample evidence across a variety of academic and public policy domains supports the relationships and patterns depicted in the diagram. There is no question of the need to “Break the Cycle” at any level and thereby reduce the phenomenon of Environmental Health Disparities and promote good health and well being for children and their families.

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