FACULTY

MEET THE PSYCHOLOGY INTERNSHIP FACULTY

Supervising Faculty Members

Tiffany Aronson, PsyD is a senior psychologist in Clinical Assessment and Diagnostics (CAD) and Clinical Assessment Core. Dr. Aronson received her doctoral degree in Clinical Psychology from Nova Southeastern University in 2010. She completed her pre-doctoral internship at Miami Children’s Hospital and her postdoctoral fellowship in the Pediatric Neurodevelopmental Center at the Marcus Autism Center. After fellowship, Dr. Aronson returned to South Florida as the Director of Clinical Services at a nonprofit organization. Dr. Aronson returned to Marcus Autism Center in 2014, where she focuses on diagnosis and treatment planning for young children with autism spectrum disorder.

T. Lindsey Burrell, PhD is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Autism and Related Disorders in the Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine. She received her PhD in clinical psychology at Texas Tech University, where she was also a research team member in the Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) Group. She completed internship at the Marcus Autism Center and continued to complete a clinical postdoctoral fellowship in the feeding program and a second year research fellowship focusing on modifying and delivering the Research Units for Behavior Intervention (RUBI) Autism Network parent training program for children with ASD via telehealth and parent groups. Dr. Burrell’s research focuses on developing, evaluating and delivering community viable parent-mediated interventions to decrease disruptive behaviors in children with ASD and improve feeding in young children. Dr. Burrell provides outpatient clinical services through the Severe Behavior program as well as the Feeding program.

Nathan A. Call, PhD received his PhD in School Psychology from the University of Iowa in 2003 under the mentorship of David P. Wacker, PhD He completed a pre-doctoral internship at the University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics and Center for Disabilities & Development and a post-doctoral fellowship at the Marcus Institute and Emory University under the supervision of Wayne Fisher, PhD, and Henry S. Roane, PhD After working as an assistant professor at Louisiana State University from 2004-2006, Dr. Call returned to the Marcus Autism Center where he is currently the director of the Severe Behavior Disorders Program. Dr. Call’s current research interests include the assessment and treatment of severe behavior disorders. This interest includes identifying the basic behavioral mechanisms that influence the occurrence of problem behavior, as well as the variables that impact the integrity with which caregivers implement treatment recommendations. Dr. Call has an active publication agenda that includes publishing and presenting research in applied behavior analytic forums.

Julie Cash, PsyD joined Marcus Autism Center in 2015. As a clinical child psychologist in the department of Clinical Assessment and Diagnostics, Dr. Cash conducts developmental and diagnostic evaluations with young children. Dr. Cash received her doctorate in Clinical Psychology from Indiana University of Pennsylvania and completed her predoctoral internship in Clinical Psychology at the University of Rochester Medical Center and Golisano Children’s Hospital. She completed her postdoctoral fellowship at Emory University School of Medicine through the Marcus Autism Center. Dr. Cash has spent the past several years conducting psychoeducational, neuropsychological, and developmental assessments as well as individual and group therapy with children with a range of developmental disabilities and mental health difficulties. She has also provided psychological and behavioral health consultation and treatment to families, parents, and children in outpatient, inpatient, and pediatric health service settings. Dr. Cash is passionate about working with families affected by autism spectrum disorders, specifically in the areas of assessment and diagnostics, parent training and social skills training and development. She strives to provide accurate developmental information and empirically supported treatments.

Kristen K. Criado, PhD earned her doctorate in clinical psychology at the University of Florida. She completed her internship and postdoctoral fellowship at the Mailman Center for Child Development at the University of Miami. After working as a research assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Miami, Dr. Criado joined the Marcus Autism Center and the faculty at Emory University. She is a supervisor in the outpatient clinics in the Pediatric Feeding Disorder Program. Her research focuses on instrument development and treatment outcomes research in children with ASD and feeding disorders.

Laura Dilly, Ph.D., NCSP completed her doctorate in school psychology at Michigan State University. She completed her doctoral internship at the Houston Independent School District. Dr. Dilly then worked within the public school districts for 10 years as a lead psychologist and training coordinator. At the Marcus Autism Center, Dr. Dilly conducts assessments of young children who are suspected to have an autism spectrum disorder. Her research interests involve the intersection of the school based and medically based services for children with autism spectrum disorders and the training of professionals in the provision of ASD services.

Samuel Fernandez-Carriba, PhD is a Senior Psychologist at the Marcus Autism Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, and Assistant Professor at the Emory School of Medicine Department of Pediatrics. He obtained his PhD in Clinical and Health Psychology from Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain. Two years of his doctoral training took place at the Yerkes National Research Primate Center (Emory), where he approached the study of human emotions through an examination of biological determinants and evolutionary history as observed in the chimpanzee. After his return to Emory, he completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Emory Autism Center (Emory School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry). At the Marcus Center, he conducts diagnostic evaluations on children and teenagers with ASD and related disorders, as well as research on two related topics: (1) sociocultural factors in ASD and cultural competence in healthcare providers, and (2) the role of cultural belief systems and values in health and well-being and the potential of an approach to health care that includes training in universal ethics, such as compassion meditation practice. He obtained his CBCT (Cognitively Based Compassion Training) Instructor Certificate at Emory University in 2013.

Caitlin Herzinger Delfs, Ph.D., BCBA-D completed her doctorate in school psychology at the University of Georgia. She completed her doctoral internship and postdoctoral fellowship at Marcus Autism Center and Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. Dr. Delfs is currently an assistant professor in Pediatrics at Emory University and the program manager of the Language and Learning Clinic: Home-based Program and the Community Autism Program. She is responsible for developing and overseeing language intervention and behavioral programming, staff training and supervision, supervision of undergraduate and graduate level trainees, and parent training/consultation. Her current research interests include efficient teaching procedures to improve language and social communication in children with autism, community based interventions, and the impact of culture on behavioral interventions.

Christine Hall, PhD received her doctoral degree in clinical psychology from Emory University. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Emory University School of Medicine and Marcus Autism Center, in the Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Drug Exposure Center. For the next several years, Dr. Hall continued to conduct research with the Maternal Substance Abuse project in the Emory University Department of Psychiatry and also maintained a private practice. In 2008, Dr. Hall rejoined Marcus Autism Center where she is manages the psychology staff within the Pediatric Neurodevelopmental Center. She coordinates training experiences that involve conducting comprehensive psychological assessments for children to determine diagnosis and treatment planning. She has a special interest in providing services to children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), anxiety disorders, mood disorders and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Bethany Hansen, PhD, BCBA-D completed her doctorate in school psychology at the Oklahoma State University. She completed her doctoral internship and postdoctoral fellowship at Marcus Autism Center and Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. Dr. Hansen is currently an assistant professor in Pediatrics at Emory University and is a psychologist in the Language and Learning Clinic. She is responsible for developing and overseeing language intervention and behavioral programming, training and supervision of staff and trainees, intakes, and caregiver consultation. Her current research interests include evaluating efficient teaching strategies that teach children with autism academic skills and promote skill emergence. Additional areas of research include evaluating approaches to providing community services, such as caregiver training.

Sara Hoffenberg, PsyD, ABPP, is a program manager in Clinical Assessment and Diagnostics (CAD) at the Marcus Autism Center and an Assistant Professor in the Division of Autism and Related Disorders in the Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine. Her primary focus is on diagnosis and treatment planning for young children with autism spectrum disorders. She also manages the training program in the CAD, including postdoctoral fellows, interns, graduate and undergraduate practicum students, as well as medical residents. Dr. Hoffenberg earned her doctorate in clinical psychology from the Georgia School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University. She completed her postdoctoral fellowship at Emory University School of Medicine and her pre-doctoral internship at Miami Children’s Hospital. Dr. Hoffenberg’s primary research interests include early identification, diagnosis, and screening of autism spectrum disorders.

Kathryn Holman Stubbs, Ph.D. received her doctoral degree in Clinical Psychology from University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee. She completed her doctoral internship at Munroe Meyer Institute (University of Nebraska Medical Center) and her fellowship through Emory University School of Medicine at the Marcus Autism Center in the Pediatric Feeding Disorders Program. She is currently a senior psychologist in the Pediatric Feeding Disorders Program where she works with children and families to develop effective treatments to improve mealtime behavior in the day treatment and outpatient programs and provides consultation in pediatric gastroenterology clinics. She supervises predoctoral interns and postdoctoral fellows in the intensive day treatment program for children with feeding disorders. Her clinical and research interests have focused on the assessment and treatment of children with pediatric feeding disorders as well as treatment adherence in pediatric populations.

David L. Jaquess, PhD, ABPP, BCBA-D received a PhD in Clinical Psychology from Virginia Tech in 1993 under the tutelage of Jack Finney; he also worked on research there with Thomas Ollendick and Richard Winnet. He completed a doctoral internship at the Medical University of South Carolina and a postdoctoral fellowship at the Kennedy Krieger Institute and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine where he briefly remained on the faculty. Dr. Jaquess has taught at various levels in higher education from undergraduates in a comprehensive liberal arts college to postdoctoral fellows. Currently he is the Director of Training for the Center (including Training Director for the Doctoral Psychology Internship and Associate Director for the Emory University Postdoctoral Fellowship), and the Assistant Division Director for Faculty Development in Emory Department of Pediatrics, Division of Autism & Related Disorders. Areas of research interest include empirical support of using behavior analytic techniques for pediatric feeding disorders, quality improvement in healthcare and training systems, and general stress management.

Amy Kincheloe, PhD received her doctoral degree in Clinical Psychology from Emory University in 2011. Dr. Kincheloe completed her doctoral internship with the Emory University School of Medicine and her postdoctoral fellowship in the Pediatric Neurodevelopmental Center at Marcus Autism Center, where she conducted neurodevelopmental and diagnostic assessments with children and adolescents suspected of having autism spectrum disorders. After working in private practice for a few years, Dr. Kincheloe returned to Marcus Autism Center in 2015 and she now works as a psychologist with the Clinical Assessment Core.

Cheryl Klaiman, Ph.D. received her doctorate in School and Applied Child Psychology from McGill University under the mentorship of Jacob Burack. She completed her internship and post-doctoral training at the Yale Child Study Center where she worked with Drs. Ami Klin, Fred Volkmar, Robert Schultz and Sara Sparrow. She joined the faculty of the Yale Child Study Center as an Associate Research Scientist, and then relocated to California where she was the Director of the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Interdisciplinary Care Team at Children’s Health Council in Palo Alto, CA. She joined the team at The Marcus Autism Center and Emory University in January of 2012 where she directs the FDA regulated clinical trial which is attempting to validate our eye-tracking work as a medical device. She also works on the clinical characterization team among other various research projects. Research interests include early diagnosis and screening of autism spectrum disorders, innovative treatment strategies and clinical trials.

David J. Marcus, PhD is a Clinical Instructor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and a pediatric neuropsychologist at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. He received his doctorate in Child Psychology from the University of Minnesota in 2005, completed an internship at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (through University of Pennsylvania) and a fellowship at National Children’s Medical Center in Washington, DC. Active as a clinical teacher, he supervises graduate practicum students, interns, residents and fellows. Dr. Marcus’s areas of interest include pediatric epilepsy, spina bifida, and genetic and metabolic disorders.

Joanna Lomas Mevers, Ph.D., BCBA-D received her doctorate in school psychology from Louisiana State University, under the mentorship of Jeffery Tiger, PhD and George Noell, PhD. She completed her pre-doctoral internship and postdoctoral fellowship at the Marcus Autism Center and Emory University under the supervision of Nathan Call, PhD. Dr. Lomas Mevers is currently the interim director for the severe behavior programs and is responsible for working with families and clinicians to develop effective behavioral interventions that decrease challenging behaviors and replace them with appropriate behaviors. In addition to her clinical duties she also provides training for doctoral and postdoctoral trainees. Dr. Lomas Mevers’ current research interests include increasing the social validly of behavioral interventions, increasing efficiencies in caregiver training, treatment of enuresis and encopresis.

Shana Richardson, PhD, is a clinical psychologist and member of the research assessment core. Dr. Richardson completed her undergraduate training in psychology at the University of Georgia and earned her doctorate degree from Georgia State University. Dr. Richardson completed her predoctoral internship at Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri. She returned to Atlanta for her postdoctoral fellowship with Emory University School of Medicine and the Pediatric Neurodevelopmental Center (PNC) at Marcus Autism Center. In her current position at Marcus, Dr. Richardson conducts psychological assessments for families participating in the various research studies, with a focus on the clinical characterization of infants and toddlers.

Celine Saulnier, PhD is the Director of Research Operations at the Marcus Autism Center and an Associate Professor in the Division of Autism and Related Disorders in the Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine. She is also the Director of the Clinical Assessment Core for the NIH Autism Center of Excellence program project. She obtained her PhD in clinical psychology from the University of Connecticut, with a concentration in neuropsychology. She then completed a two-year postdoctoral fellowship at the Yale Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine prior to joining the Yale faculty. At Marcus, Dr. Saulnier manages and supervises multidisciplinary diagnostic and clinical evaluations on individuals with autism and related disorders from infancy through young adulthood. The focus of her research is on profiles of adaptive behavior in autism, particularly on the discrepancies between cognitive potential and functional application of skills to daily contexts.

Mindy Scheithauer, PhD, BCBA-D received her PhD from Louisiana State University with a dual emphasis in Clinical and Biological Psychology and a minor emphasis in School Psychology. She completed a doctoral internship in the Neurobehavioral Unit at the Kennedy Krieger Institute through Johns Hopkins University and a postdoctoral residency at Marcus Autism Center through Emory University. Dr. Scheithauer is an assistant professor in Pediatrics at Emory University and is a psychologist in the Severe Behavior Program. She oversees the Brief Behavior Intervention program (a primarily community-based treatment service) and supervises cases in the Severe Behavior Day Treatment program. Her current research focuses on automatically maintained problem behavior, assessment and treatment of elopement, and improving methods for observational data collection. Her future research goals include clinical trials of specific behavioral treatments and the study of applied behavioral pharmacology through the use of functional analyses in drug trials. Dr. Scheithauer assists with the supervision and training of doctoral and postdoctoral training.

William G. Sharp, PhD is the Director of the Pediatric Feeding Disorders Program at the Marcus Autism Center and an Assistant Professor in the Division of Autism and Related Disorders in the Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine. He received his doctorate from The University of Mississippi in 2006, with an emphasis in pediatric and clinical child psychology. Dr. Sharp completed a doctoral internship and a post-doctoral fellowship at A.I. duPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, DE, where he focused on the application of behaviorally-based interventions for severe behavior problems, feeding issues, anxiety and sleep difficulties. His current research interests include the assessment and treatment of feeding disorders among children with autistic spectrum disorders, the impact of antecedent manipulations in the treatment of pediatric feeding disorders, and the use of parent training to address feeding difficulties.

Renee’ Ussery, PsyD received her doctoral degree in clinical psychology from Argosy University. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship in private practice and the Marcus Autism Center. For the next several years, Dr. Ussery completed psychological evaluations with children and adolescents in private practice In 2008, Dr. Ussery rejoined Marcus Autism Center where she continued to complete assessments with school aged children within the Pediatric Neurodevelopmental Center. She coordinates training experiences that involve conducting comprehensive psychological assessments for children and adolescents who present with complex histories and differential diagnosis is essential.

Valerie Volkert, PhD, BCBA-D is a psychologist program manager in the Pediatric Feeding Disorders Program at Marcus Autism Center. She also holds the position of Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Emory University School of Medicine. She received her doctorate in school psychology from Louisiana State University, completed a doctoral internship at the Marcus Institute and a postdoctoral residency at the Munroe-Meyer Institute. She was faculty at the Munroe-Meyer Institute for seven years and during that time she was President of the Heartland Association for Behavior Analysis (2009-2011) and training director for the MSIA PhD program in ABA and Nebraska Internship Consortium in Professional Psychology in the Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders (2012-2015). An active clinician, teacher and researcher, she sees patients in the outpatient clinics of the Feeding program, supervises interns and fellows and pursues lines of clinical research. Of particular interest are treatments to increase advanced feeding skills (e.g., self-feeding and chewing).

Contributing Faculty Members

Thomas G. Burns, PsyD ABPP/CN is a Clinical Instructor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and is Director of Neuropsychology at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta where he provides supervision in the child neuropsychology rotation. Dr. Burns received his doctorate in 1995 from the Georgia School of Professional Psychology and is board certified in neuropsychology. Dr. Burns conducts neuropsychological examinations with infants, children, and adolescents and conducts Intracarotid Amobarbital (Wada) Tests in pediatric temporal lobe seizure surgery candidates. His research interests include memory and executive functioning following pediatric brain injury, pediatric epilepsy, and cortical dysplasia.

Karlene Coleman, RN, MN, CGC holds nursing degrees from Medical College of Georgia and Emory University and she completed post-graduate training in genetic counseling at Emory University. She is Board Certified in Genetic Counseling, American Board of Medical Genetics, Inc. Her research interests include several collaborative projects involving CHOA, Emory, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) including incidence, morbidity and mortality after cardiac surgery, and clinical presentations in 22q11 deletions. This syndrome is one of the more common chromosome problems seen in the pediatric population and is currently estimated to occur in 1 of every 4,000 live births.

Warren Jones, PhD received his doctorate in biomedical sciences from Yale University. From 2000 to 2003, he worked at the Yale Child Study Center with Ami Klin, PhD During his time at Yale, Dr. Jones used eye-tracking technology to map visual salience young children with autism, as they view movies of social interaction. In a lab setting, Jones uses concealed cameras that zoom in on children's eyes and monitor the movement of their pupils to determine exactly what they are viewing on the TV screen. In 2006, Dr. Jones was awarded the American Psychological Foundation Elizabeth Munsterberg Koppitz Award for his work with eye-tracking technology. He serves as the Director of Research for the Center.

Ami Klin, PhD is the Director of the Marcus Autism Center and Professor and Chief of the Division of Autism and Related Disorders in the Department of Pediatrics at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Klin is an internationally recognized psychologist and researcher. His primary research activities focus on developmental social neuroscience; specifically on visual engagement of individuals with autism from infancy through adulthood. In his most noted work, Klin uses eye-tracking technology to visualize and measure social engagement, allowing him to monitor infants who potentially have an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). His research goal is to identify individuals with and at risk for ASD as early as possible so that potential therapies can have their maximal effect. He serves as Chief Psychologist of the Internship.

Jennifer L. Stapel-Wax, PsyD received her doctorate in clinical psychology from the Georgia School of Professional Psychology in 1998. She completed her doctoral internship at Miami Children’s Hospital in pediatric behavioral medicine and her postdoctoral fellowship at the Emory University School of Medicine at the Marcus Center for Development and Learning. Following her fellowship, Dr. Stapel-Wax was appointed as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at Emory University School of Medicine. She directed a statewide evaluation project for children with complex neurodevelopmental disorders and conducted neurodevelopmental assessments with infants to school age children through for 13 years, supervising dozens of trainees in this clinical setting. Dr. Stapel-Wax taught graduate clinical psychology for 14 years at the Georgia School of Professional Psychology. She currently is the Director of Infant and Toddler Clinical Research and an Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics. Dr. Stapel-Wax consults nationally and internationally on topics of neurodevelopmental disabilities and is a Past President of the Georgia Psychological Association. Her current clinical and research interests lie in teaching and training, assessment of young children and community implementation of scientifically based methods of screening, assessment and intervention.